Bariatric Times

APR 2018

A peer-reviewed, evidence-based journal that promotes clinical development and metabolic insights in total bariatric patient care for the healthcare professional

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C l i n i c a l D e v e l o p m e n t s a n d M e t a b o l i c I n s i g h t s i n To t a l B a r i a t r i c P a t i e n t C a r e Volume 15, Number 4 April 2018 A P e e r - R e v i e w e d P u b l i c a t i o n Follow us. Inside EDITORIAL MESSAGES ................ 3 A Message from Dr. John M. Morton: News and Notes on the Latest Issue of BT A Message from Dr. Christopher Still: YWM2018: A Place for Your Patients and You THE MEDICAL STUDENT NOTEBOOK ................................ 8 Weight Loss Medications for Patients: A Review JOURNAL WATCH .................... 10 REVIEW .................................. 12 Clinical Practices to Mitigate Weight Bias ASK THE LEADERSHIP ............. 18 Q&A on ASMBS Approving Intragastric Balloon NEWS AND TRENDS ................ 19 ORIGINAL RESEARCH .............. 20 Further Psychometric Validation of BODY-Q: Ability to Detect Change Following Bariatric Surgery Weight Gain and Loss SOARD TOC ............................. 24 WALTER PORIES CARTOON ...... 25 CALENDAR OF EVENTS ............ 25 ADVERTISER INDEX ................. 25 CLASSIFIED AD INFO ............... 25 REVIEW Clinical Practices to Mitigate Weight Bias by RUCHI S. DOSHI, MD, MPH, and KIMBERLY A. GUDZUNE, MD, MPH INTRODUCTION The quality of healthcare can be influenced by personal characteristics of the clinicians and patients, as well as the systemic organization of the clinical environment. 1–3 One primary factor in providing quality healthcare, as perceived by both patients and clinicians, is the patient-clinician relationship. 4,5 The perceptions and attitudes of both the clinician and patient can influence their relationship. 6–9 Clinician attitudes toward patients can affect clinician behaviors, ultimately influencing the quality of healthcare. 10–13 Negative clinician attitudes can affect the patient-clinician relationship, contributing to healthcare disparities. 13–15 Multiple factors can affect clinician attitudes, including visible patient characteristics. Past studies have found that age and race can both affect clinician attitudes and behaviors, with physicians respecting older patients 6 and exhibiting a more positive affect and patient centeredness toward white patients compared to African-American patients. 7 Similarly, a patient's weight might also impact the patient- clinician relationship and the quality of care provided. 13,16 Past literature has shown that individuals with obesity are often stigmatized, 17,18 and health professionals have demonstrated biases toward them. 19,20 Indeed, the bias of these health professionals are both implicit 20,21 and explicit. 22,23 Page 12 Download the BT app for your mobile device! iTunes Google (Android) Scan this QR code with your QR reader for the digital edition of Bariatric Times. Page 8 Presorted Standard U.S. Postage PAID Lebanon Junction, KY Permit #344 Weight Loss Medications for Patients: A Review INTRODUCTION Obesity is one of the most common causes of disability today. In the United States alone, nearly two-thirds of Americans have overweight or obesity. 1 Obesity is also reaching epidemic proportions worldwide as well. 2 Weight loss can help patients with obesity avoid suffering from such medical conditions as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. 1 It is critical that effective treatment options exist to help patients tackle this problem. Obesity, however, is difficult to treat and often requires multiple therapeutic modalities. The first measures usually involve intensive lifestyle interventions, including strict diet, exercise, and cognitive changes to promote healthy eating and increased activity. Later measures can include a combination of lifestyle intervention and bariatric surgery, which is highly effective for both weight loss and control of associated comorbidities. 3 Few other options exist for patients seeking a bridge between behavioral changes and invasive surgery. The Medical Student Notebook COLUMN EDITOR Daniel B. Jones, MD, MS, FASMBS FEATURED STUDENT Manoj Kanagaraj, BS, BA

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