Bariatric Times

JAN 2015

A peer-reviewed, evidence-based journal that promotes clinical development and metabolic insights in total bariatric patient care for the healthcare professional

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C l i n i c a l D e v e l o p m e n t s a n d M e t a b o l i c I n s i g h t s i n To t a l B a r i a t r i c P a t i e n t C a r e V olume 12, Number 1 January 2015 A P e e r - R e v i e w e d P u b l i c a t i o n CALENDAR OF EVENTS ...................29 MARKETPLACE ...............................30 AD INDEX ........................................30 W W W . B A R I A T R I C T I M E S . C O M LIKE us on Facebook • FOLLOW us on Twitter • CONNECT with us on LinkedIn Presorted Standard U.S. Postage PAID Lebanon Junction, KY Permit #344 WELCOME, DR. CHRISTOPHER STILL: CO-CLINICAL EDITOR ITunes Google (Android) Download the BT app for your mobile device! Scan this QR code with your QR reader for the digital edition of Bariatric Times. REVIEW INTRODUCTION Morbid obesity is associated with an increased incidence of comorbidities like type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hypertension (HTN), obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis (NASH), and coronary artery disease (CAD). These comorbidities can be treated very effectively and consistently by bariatric surgery, resulting in improved quality of life and survival. 1 Although the safety profile of bariatric surgery has improved greatly over the last several years, patients who undergo bariatric surgery are higher risk patients, especially those with male gender, age more than 50 years, body mass index (BMI) more than 60kg/m 2 and intra-operative complications. 2 If patients undergoing bariatric surgery develop a complication, they may require intensive care management. This article details the pathophysiology of obesity, sepsis, and management of the various unique aspects of bariatric patients and differentiates them from the general patient population in the intensive care unit (ICU). Intensive Care Management, Sepsis, and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome in the Bariatric Patient by VIVEK BINDAL, MS, FNB, and RANJAN SUDAN, MD Page 21 COLUMN EDITOR Daniel B. Jones, MD, MS, FACS FEATURED STUDENT Wendy W. Liu, PhD Do You Have the Right Guts? Obesity and the Gut Microbiome THE GUT MICROBIOME Although we may be unaware, all of us are colonized by microorganisms both inside and out. There are around 1.5kg of bacteria in our gut, and many more that cover our skin. In fact, 90 percent of cells in our body are microbial cells. 1 It has been increasingly recognized that the gut microbiome can have an important contribution to health and disease. Gut bacteria produce molecules that enter the bloodstream via the enterohepatic circulation or through damaged gut mucosa. Some bacteria are beneficial, producing anti-inflammatory factors, analgesic compounds, antioxidants, and vitamins. Conversely, other bacteria create toxins that can damage DNA and affect the nervous and immune systems. 2 T h e M E D I C A L S T U D E N T N o t e b o o k EDITORIAL MESSAGE .......................3 EDITORIAL BOARD ............................5 Also Inside LETTER TO THE EDITOR .....................8 A Comment on Checklists in Bariatric Surgery Vitamin Deficiency after Bariatric Surgery: Parts 1 and 2 CHECKLISTS IN BARIATRIC SURGERY ......................15 Checklist Enhanced Recovery after Bariatric Surgery NEWS AND TRENDS ........................16 HOT TOPICS IN INTEGRATED HEALTH ......................24 Moving: The New Exercise Prescription SYMPOSIUM PREVIEW ...................27 14 th Annual Surgery of the Foregut Symposium Plus: The 2 nd Annual International Congress of Fluorescent Guided Imaging Surgery SYMPOSIUM PREVIEW ...................28 The 15 t h Annual Minimally Invasive Surgery Symposium (MISS) Page 10

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