Bariatric Times

AUG 2017

A peer-reviewed, evidence-based journal that promotes clinical development and metabolic insights in total bariatric patient care for the healthcare professional

Issue link: http://bariatrictimes.epubxp.com/i/865449

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 4 of 44

4 Bariatric Times • August 2017 s imilar philosophy applies. Though research on HIIT is still early, growing evidence shows that through HIIT, individuals might achieve the benefits of traditional continuous exercise training ( e.g., increased cardiorespiratory fitness and insulin sensitivity) in 50 to 60 percent of the training time. 2–4 We are proud to spotlight another ASMBS State Chapter this month. ASMBS Texas State Chapter President Michael V. Seger, M D, FACS, FASMBS, and colleagues provide an update on obesity in their state. Texas is one of the first four states that initiated its own chapter prior to the creation of a nationwide call by the A SMBS to have representation of all states. Lloyd Stegemann, MD, FACS, FASMBS, served as its first president and delivered phenomenal work to help ASMBS leadership establish state chapters. In another spotlight column titled "Bariatric Center S potlight," we showcase the Bariatric Program at BayCare Mease Dunedin Hospital in Dunedin, Florida. Don't miss the 13th Annual Bariatric Times Buyers Guide, which highlights products and services of many companies that h ave become an integral part of our specialty. Access the Buyers Guide via the BT APP or e-Edition to get the full interactive experience of easily linking directly to company websites. I hope you enjoy this issue of Bariatric Times. I look forward to seeing many of you at the 22nd World Congress of International Federation for the Surgery of Obesity and Metabolic Disorders (IFSO), taking place in London, United Kingdom, August 29 to September 2, 2017, and other upcoming meetings. Sincerely, Raul J. Rosenthal, MD, FACS, FASMBS REFERENCES 1. Yuval Noah Harari. Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow. New York, New York: Harper; 2017. 2. Keating SE, Machan EA, O'Connor HT, et al. Continuous exercise but not high intensity interval training improves fat distribution in overweight adults. J Obes. 2014;2014:834865. 3. Hood MS, Little JP, Tarnopolsky MA, Myslik F, Gibala MJ. Low- volume interval training improves muscle oxidative capacity in sedentary adults. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011;43(10):1849–1856. 4. Burgomaster KA, Howarth KR, Phillips SM, et al. Similar metabolic adaptations during exercise after low volume sprint interval and traditional endurance training in humans. J Physiol. 2008 Jan 1;586(1):151–160. Epub 2007 Nov 8. A Message from Dr. Raul Rosenthal continued... A Message from Dr. Christopher Still continued... T hough it is well known that "exercise is good for you," we can further strengthen this message by explaining to our patients not only why it is good for you, but also when, meaning at what stage of the weight loss j ourney, it is absolutely essential. During periods of significant weight loss, as seen in patients who have undergone bariatric surgery, individuals also lose lean body mass. Aerobic training and resistance training have been shown to reduce fat mass and b ody mass, and also increase lean mass in individuals with overweight and obesity. 5 This is crucial during the weight maintenance stage because it is our lean body mass that maintains our metabolism. A nother important benefit of exercise to share with your patients is in the area of bone health. Overweight and obesity correlate with an increased risk of osteoporosis. 6 In patients who have undergone bariatric surgery, particularly in Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and duodenal switch, t here is malabsorption of calcium and vitamin D, which are essential to bone health. Exercise along with proper supplementation can improve bone health. Lastly, it's important to emphasize to patients that they do not have to a pproach their exercise routine with an all-or-nothing attitude. Actually, that approach is likely to set them up for failure. Instead, you might encourage them to just pick something, start small, and work their way up to higher intensity. Exercise programs often offer modified workouts to accommodate varying levels of physical fitness. Even if they cannot perform exercises at the highest echelon (e.g., the peak of the high- intensity interval during HIIT), they can still keep moving to reap the benefits of a regular exercise routine. Stay positive and check in with them during follow-up appointments. You can share in their victory when they tell you that a continuous exercise routine has given them increased tolerance and strength. Sincerely, Christopher Still, DO, FACN, FACP REFERENCES 1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Adult participation in aerobic and muscle-strengthening physical activities--United States, 2011. MMWR Morbidity and mortality weekly report. 2013; 62: 326–330. 2. Keating SE, Machan EA, O'Connor HT, et al. Continuous exercise but not high intensity interval training improves fat distribution in overweight adults. J Obes. 2014;2014:834865. 3. Hood MS, Little JP, Tarnopolsky MA, Myslik F, Gibala MJ. Low-volume interval training improves muscle oxidative capacity in sedentary adults. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011;43(10):1849–1856. 4. Burgomaster KA, Howarth KR, Phillips SM, et al. Similar metabolic adaptations during exercise after low volume sprint interval and traditional endurance training in humans. J Physiol. 2008;586(1):151–160. Epub 2007 Nov 8. 5. Willis LH1, Slentz CA, Bateman LA, et al. Effects of aerobic and/or resistance training on body mass and fat mass in overweight or obese adults. J Appl Physiol (1985). 2012;113(12):1831–1837. 6. Cao JJ. Effects of obesity on bone metabolism. J Orthop Surg Res. 2011;6:30. Letter to the Editor Submissions Bariatric Times welcomes letters for possible publication. Letters should be no more than 500 words and five references. Letters that comment on a Bariatric Times article will be considered if they are received within two months of the time the article was published. All letters are reviewed by the editors and are selected based upon interest, timeliness, and pertinence, as determined by the editors. Send letters to: Angela Saba at asaba@matrixmedcom.com or mail to: Angela Saba, Bariatric Times, Matrix Medical Communications, 1595 Paoli Pike, Suite 201, West Chester, PA 19380. Include the following statement with the letter:"The undersigned author transfers all copyright ownership of the enclosed/attached letter to Matrix Medical Communications in the event the work is published. The undersigned author warrants that the letter is original, is not under consideration by another journal, and has not been previously published. I sign for and accept responsibility for releasing this material on behalf of any and all co-authors."

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of Bariatric Times - AUG 2017